Difference between revisions of "Rosé"

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(Created page with "thumb|A rosé wine from Washington. '''Rosé''' is incorporates some of the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_color color] from...")
 
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[[File:Ciel du Cheval Red Mountain rose.jpg|thumb|A rosé wine from Washington.]]
 
[[File:Ciel du Cheval Red Mountain rose.jpg|thumb|A rosé wine from Washington.]]
'''Rosé''' is incorporates some of the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_color color] from the grape skins, but not enough to qualify it as a [[red|red wine]]. It may be the oldest known type of wine, as it is the most straightforward to make with the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maceration_(wine) skin contact method]. The pink color can range from a pale "onion-skin" orange to a vivid near-purple, depending on the varietals used and winemaking techniques. There are three major ways to produce rosé wine: skin contact, saignée, and blending. Rosé wines can be made still, semi-sparkling or sparkling and with a wide range of sweetness levels from highly dry Provençal rosé to sweet White Zinfandels and blushes. Rosé wines are made from a wide variety of grapes and can be found all around the globe.
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'''Rosé''' incorporates some of the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_color color] from the grape skins, but not enough to qualify it as a [[red|red wine]]. It may be the oldest known type of wine, as it is the most straightforward to make with the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maceration_(wine) skin contact method]. The pink color can range from a pale "onion-skin" orange to a vivid near-purple, depending on the varietals used and winemaking techniques. There are three major ways to produce rosé wine: skin contact, saignée, and blending. Rosé wines can be made still, semi-sparkling or sparkling and with a wide range of sweetness levels from highly dry Provençal rosé to sweet White Zinfandels and blushes. Rosé wines are made from a wide variety of grapes and can be found all around the globe.
  
  

Latest revision as of 12:49, 18 June 2020

File:Ciel du Cheval Red Mountain rose.jpg
A rosé wine from Washington.

Rosé incorporates some of the color from the grape skins, but not enough to qualify it as a red wine. It may be the oldest known type of wine, as it is the most straightforward to make with the skin contact method. The pink color can range from a pale "onion-skin" orange to a vivid near-purple, depending on the varietals used and winemaking techniques. There are three major ways to produce rosé wine: skin contact, saignée, and blending. Rosé wines can be made still, semi-sparkling or sparkling and with a wide range of sweetness levels from highly dry Provençal rosé to sweet White Zinfandels and blushes. Rosé wines are made from a wide variety of grapes and can be found all around the globe.


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